Late harvest Satsuma Mandarins. Get them while you can.

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As we pass into January the frantic harvesting, packing and shipping of our Satsumas to fill those holiday orders is behind us as another successful year passes into memory.  That hectic pace of December has slowed, the weather has cooled, and all of us are ready for our long winter’s nap. Our Satsumas have been associated with holidays and gifts, as a special December treat, so it is easy to assume that mandarin season is over too. Many of our customers won’t be seen again until next December.

This year however, we have hundreds of pounds of Satsumas still on the trees waiting to be harvested. The cold nights and dry warm days of the past few weeks have provided the ideal conditions for developing the sugar and flavor in the fruit. Many trees had fruit that was “not ready yet” in December, and now that fruit is perfect.

We use a brix refractometer to measure sugar in the mandarins before harvesting, and 12 or above is the Japanese standard for Satsuma. In December, if the fruit reaches 12 and has no green on the skin and tastes good to us we will harvest it to sell. Many of the “late harvest Satsumas” have brix of 13 and above but just finally have turned from green to orange and softened in the acidity. These are some of the best fruit of the season.

Unfortunately these perfect fruit also will not last long on the trees. The rain, wind and cold of January can soften the skins and beat up the fruit and soon it will be too damaged to harvest. We harvested a big pick yesterday and will not be able to pick again until after the storms that are predicted over the next few days. If they survive the wind and rain of these storms, we still anticipate only a few weeks before all our mandarins will be too damaged to sell. Now is the time to taste these “late harvest Satsumas” before they are gone.

Please contact us to arrange a time to pick up your fruit. On the farm we also have Meyer Lemons, Eureka Lemons, Algerian Clementines,Oro Blanco grapefruit and Washington Navel Oranges available for sale.

We also continue to ship boxes of Satsuma mandarins. For more information click here.

Thanks for your support of our small family farm. We hope to see you up at the farm in the next few weeks. If not, we look forward to seeing you next year.

The Burgesons

www.burgesonfamilyfarm.com

Our Shipped Boxes of Satsuma Mandarins

We are taking orders for shipped boxes of our sweet, seedless, delicious Satsuma Mandarins. When you place an order, the mandarins will be harvested, packed and shipped for you in a USPS flat rate box. Expect the mandarins within 3-7 business days from the time you order.  This is what to expect:

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The owner of the farm, Dayna, Adrian or Evan Burgeson, will hand pick the very best of the fruit from our Sierra foothill mandarin trees.

We will then take a USPS Priority Mail Flat Rate box and line it with another box. We will line that box with a soft liner. We do not use plastic in our packaging.

Box with liner

We will then hand select the mandarins to fit snugly in the box. We lay down one layer at a time. Sometimes we will put the mandarins sideways, or upside down to get a more snug fit. We may include both small and large mandarins to get a better fit so you receive the most weight for your money.partially filled box

Once the box is filled, we put our “Junior” mandarin and a card inside as a cheerful reminder that this box is from Burgeson Family Farm. The card also has information for the recipient regarding our growing practices and how to store the mandarins. filled box of mandarins

Finally the top layer is also covered with the wadding material for additional protection.

box with wadding on top  We then label the top of the box, close it up, seal it with packing tape and send it out right away, usually the very same day the box is packed.

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We try to use all biodegradable and recyclable materials to ship your mandarins. We also attempt to use the minimum amount of packing material necessary to protect the fruit so you can receive the maximum amount of fruit for your money. On occasion a few mandarins may develop cracks in the skin during shipping, but if you open the box to examine the contents immediately upon receipt and eat those mandarins first they should still be fresh and delicious. We would rather use the mandarins themselves as “packing material” rather than using plastic bubble wrap, packing peanuts and other unsustainable materials to protect our mandarins when shipping.

If you would like to order shipped boxes of our Satsuma Mandarins please go to this link to read more about how to order.