The sweetest Satsuma mandarins of the season. Available from our farm by prior arrangement.

By mid to late January, the Satsuma mandarin season is often over for us. We have usually sold all of the fruit, or the skins have become soft and the fruit does not meet our high standards. However this year we have a bumper crop, and the fruit has held up well on the trees and has ripened to perfection. The last few days, while picking this beautiful fruit, both of us have commented that these are the best Satsumas we have eaten all season, if not ever. Brix (sugar) refractometer readings in the orchard are often reading above 14. Those are some very high numbers and that means this fruit is extra sweet. Many Satsuma mandarin growers in California have sold out, but we will still have these “late harvest Satsumas” available for a few more weeks.

Now is the time to taste these “late harvest Satsuma mandarins” for yourself. We are available most days for sales by appointment. Click here for more info.

For those who are attempting to reduce their plastic footprint, we now sell our mandarins in a 10 pound box from the farm for the same price as our 10 pound mesh plastic bags. 15 dollars for the box. We also offer a 6 pound burlap sack of mandarins for 10 dollars. This sack is reusable and compostable and was made in the USA.

gift bag with copyright

In addition to Satsumas, we now are harvesting other delicious sweet citrus fruit that you can purchase if you come to visit us at the farm. We are still selling Meyer Lemons, Eureka Lemons and Washington Navel Oranges. We have a few of our “sweetie” Oro Blanco Grapefruit left but are almost sold out of those. We have just started to harvest our Sanguinelli Blood Oranges so we have a few available and more will be available for sale over the next few weeks.

Here is a little photo tour of what you will see if you come up to our farm to visit!

A few trees are still dripping with sweet Satsuma Mandarins waiting to be harvested.

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We have some of the largest, juiciest Meyer lemons and Eureka lemons that you have ever seen.

lemon tree with copyright

meyer-lemon wm

Our Sanguinelli blood oranges have started to color up. Still a bit tart with a raspberry flavor, they are perfect for use in savory recipes or for marmalade. As the season progresses they will get a bit sweeter and less tart.

blood-oranges cr

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The last of our “sweetie” Oro Blanco grapefruit have been harvested and are tucked away in our walk in refrigerator. These have been very popular and we expect we will sell out by the end of the weekend. oro-blance-trimmed wm

We are also selling “seconds” which are mandarins with skin damage that must be peeled and frozen immediately for smoothies or squeezed for juice immediately as they will spoil within a few days. But these are discount priced at 75 cents per pound.

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frozen mandarins

A visit to our farm is a refreshing way to pick up your fruit for the week. Skip the grocery store parking lot hassles, the fluorescent lights and the fruits packaged in plastic and instead come out for a breath of fresh air and extra fresh fruit packed grown without harmful pesticides and packaged in sustainable packaging.   trees loaded wm

 

For more information about our farm and our growing practices check out this link.

If you would like to contact us for questions about ordering, or to be placed on our email list, please use this link.

Thank you for your interest in Burgeson Family Farm. We hope to see you soon!

http://www.burgesonfamilyfarm.com

Candied Mandarin Rind

Rind on wood tableDon’t toss out the rinds of our Satsuma Mandarins. They make delicious candied rinds to eat as a treat or to use in baked goods or candy. We love to make panforte out of our candied mandarin rinds.

For success with this recipe I recommend you have a candy thermometer or an instant read thermometer to check the temperature of the syrup throughout the process. You also should have some parchment paper, non-stick spray or vegetable oil or shortening, a good sized saucepan with a lid, and some type of heatproof strainer. Optional items are a cooling rack, and a dehydrator.

Ingredients are only the rinds, lots of sugar, and water.

When you are peeling the Satsumas, it is easy to keep the rinds in large pieces since the rinds usually separate so easily from the fruit. Larger rinds will be easier to candy although if you plan to use chopped rind in panforte or another recipe you can also chop the rind before candying it. In this case you may not cook it to quite as high of a temperature in the final step (try 225-230 instead of 240), as it may fall apart.  When I do that, I use it right away in recipes after draining it as chopped rind is harder to dry and store.

As you are eating the Satsumas, save your large nice looking rinds in a plastic bag in the refrigerator until you have enough to make a batch. For many of our customers this does not take very long! Remove any stem ends and slice or chop if desired, or leave in good sized pieces (¼ to 1/3 of a total mandarin rind is a good size)

peels

Once you have about 6-7 cups of rinds, you are ready to candy them.

Cover the rinds with a lot of water; you cannot really use too much so a large stockpot is useful here. Bring the water to a boil, boil for 10 minutes, then drain the rinds. Do this one more time. This softens the rinds and removes some of the bitterness. Note, mandarins can have much softer rinds than other citrus so use your judgement here. If the rinds are very soft and thin you may need to shorten the boiling time or only use one boil. Make sure they do not get so soft that they will fall apart in the next step.

boiling the peel

Once the rind has been softened by boiling, drain it and set aside.

drained peels

Now, in a medium to large sized saucepan, make a syrup using 3 cups water to 6 cups sugar. The height of the syrup should not be more than about ¼ up the sides of the pan. This allows room for boiling and for adding the rinds. Stir the sugar into the water, and gradually heat it making sure it dissolves. There should be no sugar crystals on the side of the pan so wash it down with a pastry brush with water or put a lid on the pan for a few minutes to let the steam build up to wash down the sides.  Be careful not to let the pan boil over.

sugar syrup

Once the sugar is well dissolved, raise the temperature of the syrup to a rolling boil and continue to boil until it has reached the “thread stage” which is 230 F on a candy thermometer.

Now add the rind to the pan and stir it in. Tuck the rind under the syrup as best you can so it is all being infused in the syrup.

rind in syrup

Put a piece of parchment paper over the rind to help hold it under the syrup.

parchment over the rind

Now let the rind slowly simmer in the syrup for about 1 hour. Once in a while you may want to remove the paper and gently stir the rind a bit and tuck it under the syrup again to make sure all of it gets infused with the syrup.

NOTE: Excessive stirring can break up the rind, and also cause sugar crystallization so a gentle touch with minimal stirring is important in this recipe.

After one hour, remove the parchment and raise the heat to a good rolling boil. Cook the rind in the syrup, giving it a gentle stir on occasion, especially making sure it does not burn at the bottom, until the syrup thickens and reaches the firm soft ball stage which is 240-245 range on the candy thermometer. Note: If the syrup gets very thick and stirring any more is breaking up the rind, causing it to turn to mush, or if the rind has absorbed most of the syrup, stop cooking it even if it has not reached 240. Anything above 230 should be fine.

Rind in syrup finished

Now remove the rind from the syrup. The easiest way to do this is to strain it in a strainer that has relatively large openings for the syrup to go through, or to remove it from the syrup with a slotted spoon. Be careful, the syrup is very hot and can burn you.

Separate the rinds out on parchment that has been sprayed with non-stick spray or oil, and let them cool. You may want to spoon them onto the paper when they are still hot, then let them sit until they can be touched at which time you can separate them from each other. If they cool all the way while stuck together you will have a hard time separating them.

rind on parchment

To dry further you can put them on a drying rack that has been sprayed with non-stick spray or oil, and put them in a warm dry place. You can also dry them at 100-110 in a dehydrator or in an oven set on the dehydrator setting or with the oven light on. Once they are no longer sticky they are ready.

Rind on racks

To store the rind, refrigerate it or put it in an airtight container and store at room temperature. Make sure it is kept very dry. You can layer it with sugar to help keep it dry. Keep an eye on it and do not store it too long though because if moisture builds up it can occasionally grow mold and spoil.

Use in recipes or serve as is.finished rind

Our Satsumas are not sprayed with any pesticides or herbicides or fungicides so the rinds are safe to eat. Although we are not certified organic, everything we use on our crop, even our fertilizer, meets organic certification standards through OMRI   We typically do not spray anything on our mandarins except an occasional one time per season use of an organic oil spray to protect the rinds if a lot of rain is predicted. We use hoeing, weedeating and flaming to control weeds under the trees, not herbicides

To order a box of our mandarins shipped use this link. If you would like to pick them up at our farm, contact us using this link.

For more about our farm visit our website www.burgesonfamilyfarm.com

We are now selling Satsuma Mandarins and they are delicious!

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We have a great supply of delicious Satsuma mandarins this year.

We will be open weekends from 12-4 pm and other hours by appointment. If you would like to place a large order, or to check on supply or pick up mandarins on weekdays, or if you have further questions please contact us by email questions using this link.

10 pound bags of Satsumas are 15 dollars per bag when purchased directly at the farm.

We also have Meyer Lemons, limes, Oro Blanco and other specialty citrus available.

We also are now shipping boxes of Satsuma Mandarins. For more information go to this page.

Here are directions to our farm.

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lemon tree with copyright

The 2018 Satsuma Harvest has started

We are happy and excited to report that the Satsuma Mandarin crop this year is the biggest we have ever had. This season we will have plenty of delicious mandarins for everyone!

The harvest will start just in time for the Mandarin Festival on the weekend of November 17.   We do not have a booth at the festival, but will be available for sales from the farm on Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 pm. We also are available other hours by appointment.

The quality of fruit is excellent this year, and we will have plenty, but it will not all be ready at one time.  As our long term customers know, we will only pick fruit that is perfectly ripe, so once we have picked everything that meets our standards, we will wait a few days before we go out to the orchard to pick again.  The harvest is going to be great and prolonged this year, but we try our best to never sell a sour or tasteless mandarin, even if we have to tell people at times “we don’t have any ready right now”.  We appreciate the understanding and support of our customers who are patient with us and Mother Nature.

adrian-picking watermarked

Adrian carefully chooses each perfectly ripe fruit and clips it from the tree to put in bags and boxes for our customers. This assures that only the very best fruit leaves our farm.

This year we have dropped the price of mandarins to $15.00 for a ten pound bag but only for sales directly from the farm.

We will be open on weekends from 12-4 and other hours by appointment. (Closed Dec 23-28 for holiday break). We are usually here weekdays as well and can have mandarins ready for you on short notice. If you would like to pick up a large order of mandarins you may want to contact us in advance to be sure we have your order ready when you arrive. Please contact us using the information on this link. 

We do not accept credit cards for sales at the farm.

Thanks for being such a great friend of our farm. We always look forward to this time of year when we can visit with all the friends we have made over the years. We look forward to seeing you soon.

Dayna and Adrian Burgeson

Please note: If you are interested in buying shipped boxes of Satsuma Mandarins please use this link: https://wordpress.com/post/burgesonfamilyfarm.com/94557